ROS vitamin D and bone health guideline

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This summary is a quick guide on who to test for vitamin D deficiencies, how to interpret the results, treatment options, and follow up.

The 2018 Royal Osteoporosis Society guideline has a new threshold for ascertaining vitamin D deficiency. Populations with vitamin D levels (serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]) of <25 nmol/L (as opposed to a previous threshold of <30 nmol/L) are deemed to be deficient in vitamin D.

Notwithstanding the recommendations, however, it worth pointing out that the annual cost to NHS England for prescribing vitamins and minerals is around £48 million. So it comes as no surprise that the Advisory Committee on Borderline Substances has concluded that vitamins and minerals should be prescribed only in the management of actual or potential deficiencies, and are not to be prescribed as dietary supplements. The information outlined in this Guidelines summary is key in guiding CCGs to tailor their position statements on routine prescribing of over-the-counter items for the maintenance or prophylaxis of vitamin D insufficiency.

This Guidelines  summary also includes a quick guide on who to test for vitamin D deficiencies, how to interpret the results, treatment options, and follow up.

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